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    Aug
    10
    Fri
    North Cotswold Ale & Steam Weekend (CAMRA)
    Aug 10 – Aug 11 all-day
    Beers and ciders will be available at both the Winchcombe and Toddington Stations see http://www.northcotswoldcamra.org.uk
    Aug
    18
    Sat
    North Cotswold Ale & Steam Weekend (CAMRA)
    Aug 18 – Aug 20 all-day
    Beers and ciders will be available at both the Winchcombe and Toddington Stations see http://www.northcotswoldcamra.org.uk
    Sep
    7
    Fri
    North Cotswold Beer Festival (CAMRA)
    Sep 7 – Sep 8 all-day
    Noon-11pm both days 50+ real ales, 20+ cider/perry Food & soft drinks available see http://www.northcotswoldcamra.org.uk/

    14/01/2012

    BRITS FALL FOR AMERICAN CRAFT BEER

    “American craft beers have become the UK’s fastest-growing beer trend and are now starting to muscle in on territory dominated by Belgian and German specialist brews,” Tesco’s buyer told the newspaper. “UK tastes have been changing for a while now, and more and more drinkers are moving towards flavoursome brews.” The U.S. has been on the craft beer bandwagon for a while. Even in the down economy, beer drinkers have surprised everyone by sticking with pricier craft brews. Craft beers have enjoyed double-digit sales gains in three of the past five years, The Los Angeles Times reports. And while craft beer makes up only about 5% of consumption in the U.S., experts say that could rise to 10% in five or six years. The big-name beers, meanwhile, aren’t drawing the same enthusiasm they once did from loyal customers. That has led major beer-makers to focus more on craft labels. Blue Moon is made by Coors, and Anheuser Busch bought a big stake in Goose Island earlier this year. Why the sudden popularity in Britain? Observers tell the Guardian that American craft lagers taste the way British beer used to taste. They’re bold and flavorful and try to create a story and a sense of history. “The popularity of American craft lagers is very much down to how they offer similar traits associated with the British brewing scene of older years,” said Ian Lowe of the UK’s Campaign for Real Ale. “They are more heavily hopped and are higher alcohol content brews.”

    14/01/2012